Technical Tips & Service

TECHNICAL TIPS & SERVICE HELP
Hot Tips Hodaka
Quick & Easy Tips...

~How to install your new Hodaka gas tank from Clarke
~Know the difference in your pistons
~Clutch Compatibility and Blue Printing
~Frequently Asked Questions
~Wiring Diagrams by Model
~How to Install HT3 Pipe
~Hodaka Performance Tuning Notes
~Preston Petty Headlight/Number Plate Instructions
~Shift Kit Replacement
~Fork Renovation & Seal Replacement



For all recommended Hodaka specialists please click the link above.


HOT TIPS:

Hodaka Compatibility Parts List Courtesy of Bill Chapman
Tuning Mikuni Carbs
Allow more grease and better lubrication to the shifter guide and arm
Installation of PVL Ignitions
Worn shifter Case
Light & Battery Problems
Remove main shaft bushing
Do it yourself "Mini Buff"
How to Reed Valve
Air / Oil forks
Super combat Hop -Up Information
Super Combat & Superrat - Modification & Accessories
Super combat -Hop-up Information
Superrat Hop-up Information
**** Carburator cleaning for all models
**** Electrical Service tips- all models
Ignition Problems?
How to Reed Valve your Hodaka 100B
Capacitor Discharge Ignition
How to install a Combat Trailing lighting kit
Combat Wombat race reed valve induction
Combat Wombat flywheel tip
Shock Absorber Wrench
Combat wombat - Increase breathing capacity
Front forks Dampening
Modifiy the Ace 100 for Flat track or TT Racing
Modifiy the Ace 100 for Moto Cross, Cross Country & Scrambles
Modifiy the Ace 100 for road Racing
Modifiy the Ace 100 for trials competition
Air/ Oil suspension
Exhaust diffuser - metal flashing
Break the case wide open



HOW TO INSTALL YOUR NEW CLARKE GAS TANK
Download the instructions here

Hodaka gas tank






Hodaka pistons

I need to address an issue that some of you may already know but others may not. There are two different style Hodaka pistons. A type 1 style piston (high dome) and a type 2 style piston (low dome). The type 1 (high dome) piston is specific for the Ace 100's, (96) Dirt Squirt and E series Ace 100 motors – these are “street/trail” tuned, iron cylinder, engines with cylinder hea ds which were designed to work well with the high dome piston.

The type 2 style (low dome) pistons are specific for the Super Rat (93), Super Rat (98), Road Toad and (01) Dirt Squirt – are “high performance” engines or alloy cylinder engines with cylinder heads designed to work with the low dome piston. Some obviously are drilled for a reed valve application but the outside shapes and dimensions are specific to each style. See the piston drawings for information on how to tell the pistons apart.

What I have been hearing is that people on eBay or elsewhere are selling type 2 (low dome) single dykes ring pistons as to fit the Ace 100 or type 1 (high dome) applications. This is NOT a correct application. Installing the type 2 (low dome) piston in an engine which was designed for the type 1 (high dome) will result in low compression and engine performance will not be “up to snuff”.

Note that the type 2 (low dome) piston can be used in the “street/trail” tuned engines successfully if the cylinder head from the iron cylinder Super Rat is installed at the same time. (Install the “wrong” piston and the “wrong” cylinder head and you can get back to standard performance – NOT improved performance over the “right” piston and the “right” cylinder head. Seems the hard way to go about getting back to normal.)

Bad things can happen if you install a type 1 (high dome) piston in an engine designed for the type 2 (low dome) piston. Compression will be excessively high and engine life will suffer. Excessive compression leads to excessive engine heat and detonation. Both are engine killers. Do NOT install a high dome piston in a “low dome” engine.

We do not want to see our Hodaka group using pistons that may potentially cause a problem and have you spend your hard earned money on something that is not going to work right and or harm your engine.

We hope this helps you all to better understand the difference's with the two different piston types. I am sorry that I have failed to get you the pistons in a timely manner but your help with other projects has enabled us to move forward with the HT3 pipes and some other new and exciting products to better serve the Hodaka community.

Lastly THANK YOU to my friend who took the time to help with making sure this information was clear and correctly drawn based on blueprints I had supplied...I need to address an issue that some of you may already know but others may not. There are two different style Hodaka pistons. A type 1 style piston (high dome) and a type 2 style piston (low dome). The type 1 (high dome) piston is specific for the Ace 100's, (96) Dirt Squirt and E series Ace 100 motors – these are “street/trail” tuned, iron cylinder, engines with cylinder hea ds which were designed to work well with the high dome piston.


The type 2 style (low dome) pistons are specific for the Super Rat (93), Super Rat (98), Road Toad and (01) Dirt Squirt – are “high performance” engines or alloy cylinder engines with cylinder heads designed to work with the low dome piston. Some obviously are drilled for a reed valve application but the outside shapes and dimensions are specific to each style. See the piston drawings for information on how to tell the pistons apart.

What I have been hearing is that people on eBay or elsewhere are selling type 2 (low dome) single dykes ring pistons as to fit the Ace 100 or type 1 (high dome) applications. This is NOT a correct application. Installing the type 2 (low dome) piston in an engine which was designed for the type 1 (high dome) will result in low compression and engine performance will not be “up to snuff”.

Note that the type 2 (low dome) piston can be used in the “street/trail” tuned engines successfully if the cylinder head from the iron cylinder Super Rat is installed at the same time. (Install the “wrong” piston and the “wrong” cylinder head and you can get back to standard performance – NOT improved performance over the “right” piston and the “right” cylinder head. Seems the hard way to go about getting back to normal.)

Bad things can happen if you install a type 1 (high dome) piston in an engine designed for the type 2 (low dome) piston. Compression will be excessively high and engine life will suffer. Excessive compression leads to excessive engine heat and detonation. Both are engine killers. Do NOT install a high dome piston in a “low dome” engine.

We do not want to see our Hodaka group using pistons that may potentially cause a problem and have you spend your hard earned money on something that is not going to work right and or harm your engine.

We hope this helps you all to better understand the difference's with the two different piston types. I am sorry that I have failed to get you the pistons in a timely manner but your help with other projects has enabled us to move forward with the HT3 pipes and some other new and exciting products to better serve the Hodaka community.

Lastly THANK YOU to my friend who took the time to help with making sure this information was clear and correctly drawn based on blueprints I had supplied...


John's Clutch Compatibility Chart


Blue Printing Your Clutch

Hodaka clutch

1.Take all the steel plates and line them up and
clamp them together as shown above


Put a line between two teeth. Starting there is the first groove. Not counting that groove count four more grooves and again put a line. Continue to do this all the way around. There should be seven equal spaces.

Using a 1/4" rattail (round) file each one of these seven spots where the seven lines are to the bottom of each groove. Take the clamp off and deburr each of the 1/4" filed slots.
As seen in photo

Hodaka clutch
When installing these plates in the clutch, these slots should go where the bolts go through the clutch. As shown
hodaka clutch
This last photo shows what the clutch should look like when going back together. Also the tool needed to finish the work.

Here are photos and descriptions describing on how to blueprint your Hodaka clutch for much easier use.
These photos and text were sent to me by someone I trust but who would like to remain anonymous. I hope this helps you all as I have been doing this for years with great success . ~Paul

Any further questions please feel free to email me at Paul@StrictlyHodaka.com




Helpful Tips

Devoted to help solve some of The most frequently asked Hodaka questions

"Roger Lippiat has figured a simple way to repair those hard to find upper coils. Thank you Roger for the work and thanks to Ed Chesnut for the photo"

Hodaka spark plug

Simple timing setting for bikes with points:
This will work for all Hodaka models that use points. For photo purposes we used an Ace 100 motor I was working on, but you will find the same markings on your other models.

First remove your magneto cover so you can view your flywheel/stator assy. (Photo A) You will find a mark on the outside of your flywheel along with two marks on your left inside case. The two marks on your left inside case are located at the 11:00 position and the 12:00 position. Disregard the mark at the 12:00 position and only work with the 11:00 mark. You can see the flywheel mark and 11:00 mark highlighted in red by us for easier viewing purposes. Line up the two marks as seen in the above photo. Once this is done you will be able to look into the stator assy through the opening in the flywheel. ( Photo B) You will need to loosen the screw to the right of the points by only a 1/4 turn max. There is a slotted area that is part of the back of the points which when fitted with a small flat head screwdriver and turned slightly will open or close the points depending on which way you turn it (clockwise or counterclockwise). ( Photo C) You can see this in the highlighted red area in the photo. You will need to use a feeler gauge to measure the gap between the points. Most Hodaka models are .012" - .015" gap. I use .013" which works well for me. Once the gap is set you will need to re-tighten the screw that you loosened. Sometimes when you go to re-tighten the screw the points will close on you. If this happens you might try and re-loosen the screw again set your gap this time to .015" and re-tighten the screw. This may bring you to the .013" gap once it is tight. When you do tighten the screw be sure to double check your point gap. Happy Riding!



Wiring Diagrams by Model:

1. 125 Wombat, Wombat Diagram #2
(#2 is the same diagram but Roger Karren removed all the turn signal wiring for those who have a Model 94 to make it less confusing. Thank you, Roger)

2. Ace 100

3. Road Toad

4. Ace 90

5. Super Rat 100

6. 175 SL

7. Wombat 03

8. 250 ED Thunderdog

9. 250 SL

10. Super Combat 125



How to Install Your New HT3 Pipe

HT-3 Pipe mounting instructions for Super Combat/Super Rat (98)

First please check to see that you have all the pieces needed in your box. You should have the pipe and the stinger. You should have a black metal bracket with three holes drilled through it. There should be a Yamaha pipe mount bracket that has two bolts attached to it. There should be four springs, two Hodaka tank rubber grommets with collars, three 8 mm bolts with nyloc nuts plus a special washer that has a small hole on one end for a spring and a 8mm hole on the other end for a screw to go through.

Also included is the FMF spark arrester/muffler package. You will be using the muffler, stainless steel bracket that wraps around the muffler, a stainless steel clamp to help hold the muffler to the stinger. Be sure all parts are there before installing please. Photo 1A Photo 1AA Photo 1AAA

For the Super Combat and Super Rat (98) using a stock airbox your airbox will need to be modified. We are included a template that you can easily lay over the front of your airbox to be marked for modifications.


Step 1- Remove existing pipe on bike and front portion of the airbox from bike. Move your shock mount
to the forward position. See Photo

Step 2- Remove the front portion of your airbox (Hodaka part # 973601) from frame after you have marked the outside edge of the kicker tube as seen in this photo.


Step 3- Mount the muffler bracket that is supplied. The far right hole in the bracket lines up with the upper shock mount hole in the 12 o’clock position . Use one of the supplied 8mm bolts with nyloc nuts to pin this into place. Leave all nuts loose until everything is in place and then go back to tighten down. See Photo


Step 4- This bracket (above) was designed specifically for a Super Combat so the hole in the bracket to the left of the previous hole will line up directly with the hole in the gusset of the Super Combat frame. For the Super Rat (98) and all other models you may need to drill a new hole in the bracket to align with the hole in the gusset. Use another 8mm bolt and nyloc nut to attach to frame. We are supplying a Hodaka tank rubber grommet with metal collar to support the bracket at this hole. The tank rubber grommet and collar go in the back of the bracket between the bracket and the gusset of the frame to be used as a spacer.


Step 5- The farthest hole on the bracket to the left is used to mount the muffler via the stainless bracket. This hole needs to be widened from 6mm to 10mm. We then use the Hodaka tank rubber grommet and collar placed inside the metal bracket just like it was used inside the tabs on the original Hodaka gas tanks.
See Photo Photo #2

Step 6- Slip the pipe into the exhaust manifold and hold to the cylinder using the included exhaust springs.

Step 7- Attach the stinger end of the pipe to the actual pipe by using the included exhaust spring. See Photo


This now has your pipe roughly laid out so that you can see how it goes. If you have a Super Combat or super Rat (98) you will need to modify your airbox and right side numberplate . The following steps with explain how. If you have any other model other than the Super Combat and Super Rat you can skip the next few steps and proceed to step 9.


Step 8- Modifying your “Super” airbox for mounting the HT3 pipe. So we have changed the design to better fit in tight to the bike. See Photo #1

You will need to cut a slot into your airbox to allow the pipe to fit through.

Using the mark you have made on the outside of the kicker tube (step 2) make another mark starting at the top of the airbox and coming down 24 mm to intersect the line drawn for outline of the kicker tube (point A).

Make another mark outside the kicker tube again 28mm below point A.

Call this mark point B. The sheet metal needs to be removed from the airbox now outside of the kicker tube and between point A and point B. I personally used a dremel tool with a cutting blade which made it easy. Once this is done extend this “slot” to the outside upper right corner so to allow the pipe to slide in place.

This can easily be double checked while your pipe is mounted to the bike and being held in place by the springs. See Photo#2 Once you have enough clearance inside the airbox you can mount it back to the frame keeping all the bolts slightly loose. Modifying right side numberplate- Starting from the center of the left mount hole mark a “T” 40mm straight up. The top of the tee at 40mm. Make a horizontal line using the “T” as a mark.

Make another mark 35mm to the left of the T. Make another mark 45mm to the right of the T.

Once your bottom horizontal line is drawn mark another line straight upwards on the left side and right side of the horizontal line. Remove this patch of numberplate using a saw or dremel tool. See Photo #3


Step 9- Mount the included rubberized muffler stay to the left side gusset of the frame.
See Photo Use the longer 25mm bolt to go through the mounting hole in the pipe and s-crew it into the hole in the mounting stay with the welded nut. Lay the stay alongside the gusset and mark with a punch or marker where to drill the mounting hole in the gusset (6mm). Use the shorter (16mm) supplied bolt to adhere the stay to the gusset of the frame. See Photo

Step 10- Mounting your FMF muffler. Remove the end cap screw on front of your FMF muffler as seen in the
photo. Replace the screw and adhere the included spring holding clip. See Photo

Slide the stainless steel mounting bracket over the muffler. Photo Slide the stainless steel clamp over the front of the muffler where the muffler joins the stinger of the pipe. Slide the muffler into the stinger. Attach the last remaining spring to the spring holding clip and to the welded mount at the rear of the stinger. Tighten down the stainless steel hose clamp holding the muffler to the stinger.


Step 11- Go back now and tighten all the hardware. Double check all nuts and bolts that were either removed for mounting or added.
See Photo

Step 12- TIT (Taylor’s Idiot Tuning) This was the name given to that little pipe hanging off of your main exhaust pipe.
See PhotoThe name was given to this extension by Harry’s long time friend Mike. What I can tell you is this. This “tit” has been used by Harry on his exhaust pipes for years. It had been previously hidden so that the general person could not see it. Harry has very graciously allowed us to use this design in building the Hodaka pipes for you. There is a substantial performance gain by building this and it has been proven over and over again. I am an absolute believer. For an answer to what this does (how and why) I will let Harry tell you himself. So for a cheap plug for Hodaka Days come there and ask Harry for yourselves!


**After using the bike with the HT3 pipe it is suggested and recommended that the 6mm drain plug be removed from the bottom of the “tit” and allowed to drain any gas or oils if found. We have never seen this happen but would rather be cautious. See Photo


Step 13- Use it and have fun! If you have been using a HT2 pipe there should not be any jetting changes needed. You will find this pipe pulls better off the bottom, mid-range and top end. It comes on pipe earlier than the HT2 pipe and stays longer. Being better than the HT2 pipe say’s it all. We did not think we could build a betterod pipe than the HT2 but the HT3 is definitely better. You have just purchased something that has hundreds of thought and time but also something that was built and designed for you the Hodaka rider. Be it a race bike, cross country bike, trail bike or street legal bike this pipe was designed to fit these applications and the following models.

Specific models this was designed for: Wombat’s (with modified exhaust flange) ,Combat Wombats with (972513,982513 and 032513) exhaust flange, Super Combat, Super Rat (98), Road Toads with (972513,982513 and 032513) exhaust flange, Dirt Squirt (01) with (972513,982513 and 032513) exhaust flange and Wombat (03).


Shift Kit Replacement Instructions


03 Fork Renovation & Seal Replacement Procedure
By Bob Whitman and Ed Chesnut